The top stories, the best sites.
            
Poll: What's the future for Trump and the U.S.?
articles

content feeds for your site



sciencedaily.com      in your list

Science Daily: News Articles in Science, Health, Environment Technology

Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate environment, computers, engineering, health medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations. id=metasummary ScienceDaily -- the Internet's premier science news web site -- brings you the latest discoveries in science, health & medicine, the environment, space, technology, and computers, from the world's leading universities and research institutions. Updated several times a day, Science Daily also offers free search of its archive of more than 80,000 stories, as well as related articles, images, videos, books, and journal references in hundreds of different topics, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and more.



Reinforcement learning expedites 'tuning' of robotic prosthetics  

Researchers have developed an intelligent system for 'tuning' powered prosthetic knees, allowing patients to walk comfortably with the prosthetic device in minutes, rather than the hours necessary if the device is tuned by a trained clinical practitioner. The system is the first to rely solely on reinforcement learning to tune the robotic prosthesis.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 05:31:41



Body-painting protects against bloodsucking insects  

A study by researchers from Sweden and Hungary shows that white, painted stripes on the body protect skin from insect bites. It is the first time researchers have successfully shown that body-painting has this effect. Among indigenous peoples who wear body-paint, the markings thus provide a certain protection against insect-borne diseases.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 05:26:28



Puzzling phenomenon in a quantum gas: Insulators with conducting edges  

Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists have now modeled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. They now demonstrate how the edge states could be experimentally detected.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 05:25:17



HPV vaccination rates remain critically low among younger adolescents in the U.S.  

Only about 16 percent of U.S. adolescents have been fully vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) by the time they turn 13, despite national recommendations that call for vaccination at 11 to 12 years of age. The new findings highlight the need for stronger efforts to encourage HPV vaccination and to improve immunization rates in this key age group.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 04:47:38



Soft drinks + hard work + hot weather = possible kidney disease risk  

New research suggests that drinking sugary, caffeinated soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase the risk of kidney disease.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 03:55:05



New hope for stem cell approach to treating diabetes  

Researchers have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more responsive to fluctuating glucose levels in the blood.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 03:07:21



Dangerous increases in patients mixing opioids, benzodiazepines or Z-drugs  

The number of Americans taking a dangerous combination of both opioids and benzodiazepines -- a group of drugs commonly prescribed for pain, insomnia and anxiety -- increased by 250 percent over a 15-year period, while there was an 850 percent increase in patients taking benzodiazepines and so-called Z-drugs, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 02:42:38



Scientists accidentally engineer mice with unusually short and long tails  

Researchers from two groups studying mouse development have accidentally created mice with unusually long and unusually short tails. Their findings offer new insight into some of the key aspects controlling the development of tails in mice and have implications for understanding what happens when developmental pathways go awry.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 02:24:20



New risk score far more effective for diabetes diagnosis  

Researchers have developed a new risk score which takes into account detailed genetic information known to increase the chances of type 1 diabetes. This could be used to help identity babies at highest risk of developing the condition in the future. The score may also be used at the time of diabetes diagnosis to help decide if someone has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, which need very different treatments.

what do you think?

2019-01-18 01:06:04



Additive manufacturing reflects fundamental metallurgical principles to create materials  

Engineers have been taking a novel approach to the development of engineering components produced using additive manufacturing.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 21:43:40



This computer program makes pharma patents airtight  

Routes to making life-saving medications and other pharmaceutical compounds are among the most carefully protected trade secrets in global industry. Building on recent work programming computers to identify synthetic pathways leading to pharmaceutically complex molecules, researchers have unveiled computerized methods to suggest only synthetic strategies that bypass patent-protected aspects of essential drugs.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 21:33:46



Scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting T cells  

A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells -- which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab -- into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 21:28:25



Risk for developing more than one mental health disorder revealed  

A new study has revealed the risks behind developing a seconds mental health disorder after an initial diagnosis in the largest and most comprehensive study of comorbidity to date.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 21:17:27



Blister fluid could help diagnose burn severity  

Severe burns can leave physical and psychological scars, especially in children. When a burn patient enters the clinic, doctors use factors such as the depth and size of the burn, as well as the time required for skin healing -- or re-epithelialization -- to determine the best course of treatment. Now, researchers have found another, possibly more accurate way to classify burn severity: analyzing proteins in blister fluid.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 20:45:01



More animal species under threat of extinction, new method shows  

Currently approximately 600 species might be inaccurately assessed as non-threatened on the Red List of Threatened Species. More than a hundred others that couldn't be assessed before, also appear to be threatened. A new more efficient, systematic and comprehensive approach to assess the extinction risk of animals has shown this.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 20:38:23



Epigenetics contribute to male and female differences in fear memory  

In a mouse model of traumatic memory, male mice recall fear-related memories better than female mice, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 20:17:36



New light shed on intensely studied material  

The organic polymer PEDOT is probably one of the world's most intensely studied materials. Despite this, researchers have now demonstrated that the material functions in a completely different manner than previously believed. The result has huge significance in many fields of application.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 20:16:34



Scientists connect dots between colitis and colon cancer  

Lingering inflammation in the colon is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer and now scientists report one way it resets the stage to enable this common and often deadly cancer.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 20:01:16



Measuring ability of artificial intelligence to learn is difficult  

Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study has found.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 19:26:27



Brain cells that make pain unpleasant  

If you step on a tack, neurons in your brain will register two things: that there's a piercing physical sensation in your foot, and that it's not pleasant. Now, a team of scientists has identified a bundle of brain cells in mice responsible for the latter -- that is, the negative emotions of pain.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 18:32:08



New thermoelectric material delivers record performance  

Taking advantage of recent advances in using theoretical calculations to predict the properties of new materials, researchers have discovered a new class of half-Heusler thermoelectric compounds, including one with a record high figure of merit -- a metric used to determine how efficiently a thermoelectric material can convert heat to electricity.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 18:27:42



Scientists find increase in asteroid impacts on ancient Earth by studying the Moon  

A team of scientists has determined the number of asteroid impacts on the Moon and Earth increased by two to three times starting around 290 million years ago. Previous theories held that there were fewer craters on both objects dating back to before that time because they had disappeared due to erosion. The new findings claim that there were simply fewer asteroid impacts during that earlier period.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 18:25:34



Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer  

Researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility). The dislocations are disruptions in the regular arrangements of atoms in nanolayers. This discovery opens the possibility of engineering materials with higher ductility by simply manipulating the spacing between their dislocations and may improve the safety of structures such as buildings and bridges in earthqu

what do you think?

2019-01-17 18:07:05



Wired for obesity  

Researchers have discovered a set of genes that help to establish brain connections governing body weight.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 17:48:38



Emperor penguins' first journey to sea  

New research reveals the previously unknown behaviors of juvenile Emperor penguins in their critical early months when they leave their birth colony and first learn how to swim, dive, and find food.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 17:32:16



Sea slug study illuminates how mitochondria move  

Defects in the transport of cells' energy organelles are a suspected cause of diseases including Alzheimer's, ALS, Huntington's and Parkinson's. A new study reveals the genetics behind mitochondrial shifts.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 17:21:26



Another piece of Ebola virus puzzle: Host and virus protein interaction  

A team of researchers have discovered the interaction between an Ebola virus protein and a protein in human cells that may be an important key to unlocking the pathway of replication of the killer disease in human hosts.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 16:59:40



Can a critic-turned-believer sway others? The case of genetically modified foods  

When an advocate for one side of an issue announces that he or she now believes the opposite, can that message affect others' views? Research shows that such a conversion message can influence public attitudes. Using video of environmentalist Mark Lynas speaking about his change from an opponent of genetically modified crops to an advocate, researchers found that message had a greater impact than his direct advocacy message.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 16:41:19



Scientists confirm pair of skeletons are from same early hominin species  

Separate skeletons suggested to be from different early hominin species are, in fact, from the same species, a team of anthropologists has concluded in a comprehensive analysis of remains first discovered a decade ago.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 16:36:52



Nearly a quarter of antibiotic prescriptions for children and adults may be unnecessary  

One in 10 children and about one in six adults with private insurance received antibiotics they didn't need at least once in 2016, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 15:54:32



The cytoskeleton of neurons has been found to be involved in Alzheimer's disease  

A researcher has participated in a study describing what it is during the early stages of Alzheimer's that triggers the loss of dynamics and subsequent impairment of the dendritic spines, the compartments of the neurons responsible for receiving nerve impulses from other neurons. The role played by the actin cytoskeleton of these compartments and how it responds in the presence of beta-amyloid peptides, the component most commonly associated with Alzheimer's, have been described.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 15:29:24



How molecules teeter in a laser field  

When molecules interact with the oscillating field of a laser, an instantaneous, time-dependent dipole is induced. This very general effect underlies diverse physical phenomena. Now scientists report on an experiment where the dependence of the driven-dipole response on the bound state of an electron in a methyl iodine molecule is revealed.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 15:21:40



Saturn hasn't always had rings  

In its last days, the Cassini spacecraft looped between Saturn and its rings so that Earth-based radio telescopes could track the gravitational tug of each. Scientists have now used these measurements to determine the mass of the rings and estimate its age, which is young: 10-100 million years. This supports the hypothesis that the rings are rubble from a comet or Kuiper Belt object captured late in Saturn's history.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 14:51:23



A new hope in treating neurodegenerative disease  

Korean researchers have identified the inhibition of autophagy in microglia, brain immune cells. It is expected to help develop treatments for Alzheimer's diseases which occur due to the inhibition of autophagy.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 14:50:12



Orchards in natural habitats draw bee diversity, improve apple production  

Apple orchards surrounded by agricultural lands are visited by a less diverse collection of bee species than orchards surrounded by natural habitats.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 14:04:19



Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males  

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection -- before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 13:51:28



Lack of fair access to urban green spaces  

People with higher incomes and more education tend to have greater access to urban green spaces than their less privileged neighbors, a new study of parks and greenery in 10 major North American cities has found.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 13:14:24



Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice  

Scientists have developed a gene therapy that blocks axonal degeneration, preventing axon destruction in mice and suggesting a therapeutic strategy that could help prevent the loss of peripheral nerves in multiple conditions.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 13:06:41



New test to detect disease and infection  

Researchers have developed a highly innovative new enzyme biomarker test that has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 12:34:08



Researchers race against extinction to uncover tree's cancer-fighting properties  

As the population of a fir tree in China dwindles, researchers are racing to replicate its cancer-fighting molecules.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 12:09:02



Combination therapy treats leishmaniasis, HIV patients  

Coinfection with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been observed in at least 35 countries on four continents and requires special case management. Currently, the World Health Organization recommends AmBisome monotherapy for treatment. Now, researchers have showed that a combination therapy of AmBisome and miltefosine is more effective.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 12:05:46



Blocking hormone uptake burns more fat  

A newly discovered regulatory mechanism helps the body control the rate of fat metabolism, according to a new study. The finding may lead to new drugs to help burn stored fat and reduce weight.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 11:37:35



Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem  

It starts as a persistent and irritating pain in the foot or lower leg, then it gets more intense, maybe with swelling, and soon a runner knows she's being sidelined by one of the most common running injuries: a stress fracture. These tiny cracks in the bone can halt training for months or even end a sports season. A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but an engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring th

what do you think?

2019-01-17 11:02:35



Antibiotics still routinely prescribed in the ER for infants with viral lung infections  

Despite recommendations first issued more than a decade ago, antibiotics are still routinely prescribed in US emergency rooms for infants with bronchiolitis, a common viral lung infection. The findings highlight a concerning lag in translating evidence-based guidelines into clinical practice and underscore the need to continue educating health care providers and the public about appropriate antibiotic use.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 10:47:39



Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing in Gulf of Mexico to switch dramatically  

The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. The finding adds new insight into how extreme climate change can directly impact fundamental geological processes and how those impacts play out across different environments.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 10:42:10



Psychological distress is a risk factor for dementia  

A new study suggests that vital exhaustion -- which can be perceived as an indicator of psychological distress -- is a risk factor for future risk of dementia.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 10:30:13



Telling stories using rhythmic gesture helps children improve their oral skills  

For the first time it has been shown that a brief training session with rhythmic gestures has immediate benefits for narrative discourse in children of 5 and 6 years of age.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 09:01:53



New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook  

Electronegativity is one of the most well-known models for explaining why chemical reactions occur. Now scientists have redefined the concept with a new, more comprehensive scale.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 09:01:51



Scientists search for new methods to cure neurodegenerative diseases  

Most neurons in the human brain are generated from neural stem cells during embryonic development. After birth, a small reservoir of stem cells remains in the brain that keeps on producing new neurons throughout life. However, the question arises as to whether these new neurons really support brain function? And if so, can we improve brain capacity by increasing the number of neurons? A research group has now answered these questions.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 08:45:38



Artificially produced cells communicate with each other  

Researchers have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other. The cells, separated by fatty membranes, exchange small chemical signaling molecules to trigger more complex reactions, such as the production of RNA and other proteins.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 08:36:55



Complex molecules emerge without evolution or design  

In biology, folded proteins are responsible for most advanced functions. These complex proteins are the result of evolution or design by scientists. Now scientists have discovered a new class of complex folding molecules that emerge spontaneously from simple building blocks.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 08:34:44



Managerialism in UK schools erodes teachers' mental health and well-being  

Performance targets, increased workload, curriculum changes and other bureaucratic changes are eroding teachers' professional identity and harming their mental health, a new study finds.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 08:29:21



U.S. youth suicides more prevalent in states with higher gun ownership, study finds  

A new study finds that states with higher levels of household gun ownership also have higher overall youth suicide rates, with every 10 percentage-point increase in household gun ownership associated with a 26.9 percent increase in the youth suicide rate.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 08:14:04



Individual lichens can have up to three fungi  

Individual lichens may contain up to three different fungi, according to new research from an international team of researchers. This evidence provides new insight into another recent discovery that showed lichen are made up of more than a single fungus and alga, overturning the prevailing theory of more than 150 years.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 07:42:32



A new way to transfer energy between cells  

Researchers have described a new method for the transmission of electrons between proteins that refutes the evidence from experiments until now. This process, involved in the generation of energy in both animal and plant cells, will permit better understanding of the behavior of proteins in the cells, as well as giving a deeper understanding of the energy dysfunctions that cause diseases.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 07:36:03



Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?  

Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals like starfish and jellyfish will benefit from the opening up of new habitat.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 07:24:08



New findings reveal surprising role of the cerebellum in reward and social behaviors  

A study in rodents found that the brain's cerebellum -- known to play a role in motor coordination -- also helps control the brain's reward circuitry. Researchers found a direct neural connection from the cerebellum to the ventral tegmental area (a brain area long known to be involved in reward processing and encoding). The findings shed light on the brain circuits critical to the affective and social dysfunction seen across multiple psychiatric disorders.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 05:50:37



New findings on eye-signal blending  

Knowing precisely where the signals meet and the brain processes them is vital to treating amblyopia, or reduced vision in one eye because the brain and eye aren't working together properly.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 05:43:59



World Trade Center responders at increased risk for head and neck cancers  

A new study has found a significant increase in head and neck cancers among workers and volunteers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), pointing to newly emerging risks that require ongoing monitoring and treatment of those who were exposed during the initial response.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 05:29:49



Cultivating 4D tissues: The self-curving cornea  

Scientists have developed a biological system which lets cells form a desired shape by molding their surrounding material -- in the first instance creating a self-curving cornea. The astonishing video shows the cornea molding itself into a bowl-like structure over the course of 5 days.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 04:57:19



Local focus could help tackle global problems  

People's love for their local areas could be harnessed to tackle global environmental problems, researchers say.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 04:47:27



Size matters: To livebearer fish, big fins are a big deal  

Biologists studied the evolution of 40 molly and Limia species, and concluded dorsal fin displays arose first for males to compete with other males, only later being used in courtship displays to females. These changes in fin function went hand in hand with enlargement of the male dorsal fin. The fins reached extreme sizes in a few species and appear to be associated with rapid evolution, especially in mollies.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 03:38:44



Nanoparticle breakthrough in the fight against cancer  

A recent study has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 03:22:26



How our cellular antennas are formed  

Most of our cells contain an immobile primary cilium. The 'skeleton' of the cilium consists of microtubule doublets, which are 'pairs' of proteins essential for their formation and function. Scientists have developed an in vitro system capable of forming microtubule doublets, and have uncovered the mechanism and dynamics of their assembly. Their study reveals the crucial role of tubulin, a real building block, in preventing the uncontrolled formation of ciliary structures.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 02:58:39



Economist find a global tax on carbon may be feasible  

There is a consistently high level of public support across nations for a global carbon tax if the tax policy is carefully designed, according to a recent survey.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 02:41:10



Engineered immune cells target broad range of pediatric solid tumors in mice  

Immune cells engineered to attack childhood cancers were able to eradicate different types of pediatric tumors in mice, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 02:12:42



Mindfulness may ease menopausal symptoms  

Mindfulness may be associated with fewer menopausal symptoms for women, according to a new study. Researchers discovered that being mindful may be especially helpful for menopausal women struggling with irritability, anxiety and depression.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 01:59:52



Multiple sclerosis treatments delay progression of the disease  

A new study finds multiple sclerosis treatments have long-term benefits, and that early treatment is important. The study is the first to provide evidence that the currently available therapies can delay progression of disability in Multiple Sclerosis. It showed that early treatment -- particularly within five years of onset -- delayed the secondary progressive stage of MS, which is characterised by an ongoing increase of disability.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 01:56:34



How to rapidly image entire brains at nanoscale resolution  

A powerful new technique combines expansion microscopy with lattice light-sheet microscopy for nanoscale imaging of fly and mouse neuronal circuits and their molecular constituents that's roughly 1,000 times faster than other methods.

what do you think?

2019-01-17 01:19:33



Ozaena ground beetles likely parasitize ants throughout their life cycle  

Ozaena ground beetles likely have anatomical adaptations enabling them to parasitize ant nests throughout their life cycle, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 21:51:16



Wearable sensor can detect hidden anxiety, depression in young children  

Anxiety and depression in young children are hard to detect and often go untreated, potentially leading to anxiety disorders and increased risk of suicide and drug abuse later. In a new study, researchers showed a wearable sensor detected these 'internalizing disorders' in children with 81 percent accuracy, reducing to 20 seconds what would take clinicians months to diagnose, opening the door to inexpensive screening that could be part of routine developmental assessments.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 20:57:56



Coralline red algae have existed for 300 million years longer than presumed  

Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils prove that coralline red algae existed as far back as 430 million years ago.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 20:46:10



When activated, 'social' brain circuits inhibit feeding behavior in mice  

Feeding behavior and social stimulation activate intermingled but distinct brain circuits, and activating one circuit can inhibit the other, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 20:32:51



Fiery sighting: A new physics of eruptions that damage fusion experiments  

Sudden bursts of heat that can damage the inner walls of tokamak fusion experiments are a hurdle that operators of the facilities must overcome. Such bursts, called 'edge localized modes (ELMs),' occur in doughnut-shaped tokamak devices that house the hot, charged plasma that is used to replicate on Earth the power that drives the sun and other stars. Now researchers have directly observed a possible and previously unknown process that can trigger damaging ELMs.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 19:40:41



'Ambidextrous' robots could dramatically speed e-commerce  

Engineers present a novel, 'ambidextrous' approach to grasping a diverse range of object shapes without training.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 19:30:55



Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish  

Researchers have developed a map of chemicals found in jellyfish caught across 1 million square kilometers of UK waters. The same chemicals are found in other marine animals such as birds and fish. These findings can support conservation efforts by helping track an animals movements and also be used as a tool to detect food fraud by identifying where seafood products were sourced from.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 17:51:57



Vampire bat venom could hold key to new medical treatments  

Vampire bats could hold the key to new treatments for a range of serious medical problems, but researchers have hit a snag accessing the specimens needed to advance their work. Now scientists have found a new class of blood pressure-regulating peptides in the venom of the common vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata).

what do you think?

2019-01-16 17:12:40



Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection  

More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 16:57:35



Full carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification in a tropical coral  

Researchers have succeeded in directly measuring three key parameters necessary for skeleton formation in a live tropical coral. This way, they completely characterized the carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 15:59:55



Mechanism for leukaemia cell growth revealed, prompting new treatment hopes  

A mechanism which drives leukaemia cell growth has been discovered by researchers, who believe their findings could help to inform new strategies when it comes to treating the cancer.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 15:36:57



Scientists discover novel process to convert visible light into infrared light  

Scientists have developed a novel chemical process to convert infrared energy into visible light, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure. The discovery could advance numerous fields, including clinical applications for photodynamic therapy and drug development.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 14:34:56



High-speed supernova reveals earliest moments of a dying star  

An international team of researchers found evidence for the much theorized 'hot cocoon'.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 14:26:15



Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity  

Researchers have decoded the way structures in the inner ear give our hearing its remarkable sensitivity and selectivity.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 14:06:34



Artificial intelligence applied to the genome identifies an unknown human ancestor  

By combining deep learning algorithms and statistical methods, investigators have identified, in the genome of Asian individuals, the footprint of a new hominid who cross bred with its ancestors tens of thousands of years ago.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 13:55:45



Alterations in hippocampal structural connections differentiate between responders of ECT  

A new study in people with major depression reports that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces changes in the fibers connecting the hippocampus to brain regions involved in mood and emotion.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 13:50:25



New quantum structures in super-chilled helium may mirror early days of universe  

Experimental proof of a decades-old prediction opens a pathway to recreate possible conditions of the early universe here on earth.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 13:40:28



Simple rules predict and explain biological mutualism  

Scientists have long employed relatively simple guidelines to help explain the physical world, from Newton's second law of motion to the laws of thermodynamics. Biomedical engineers have used dynamic modeling and machine learning to construct similarly simple rules for complex biology. They have devised a framework to accurately interpret and predict the behavior of mutually beneficial biological systems, such as human gut bacteria, plants and pollinators, or algae and corals.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 13:18:42



Gastric bypass surgery may benefit muscle strength more than previously thought  

Gastric bypass surgery improves relative muscle strength and physical performance in people with obesity, according to a new study.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 13:07:48



Ammonia by phosphorus catalysis  

More than 100 years after the introduction of the Haber-Bosch process, scientists continue to search for alternative ammonia production routes that are less energy demanding. Scientists have now discovered that black phosphorus is an excellent catalyst for the electroreduction of nitrogen to ammonia. Layered black phosphorus nanosheets are a highly selective and efficient catalyst in this process.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 11:51:48



Scientists grow perfect human blood vessels in a petri dish  

Scientists have managed to grow perfect human blood vessels as organoids in a petri dish for the first time. The breakthrough engineering technology dramatically advances research of vascular diseases like diabetes, identifying a key pathway to potentially prevent changes to blood vessels -- a major cause of death and morbidity among those with diabetes.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 11:13:35



Evidence of changing seasons, rain on Saturn's moon Titan's north pole  

An image from the international Cassini spacecraft provides evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Titan, the largest of Saturn's moons. The rainfall would be the first indication of the start of a summer season in the moon's northern hemisphere.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 11:12:32



Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech  

A new, more sensitive method to measure ultrasound may revolutionize everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles. Researchers have combined modern nanofabrication and nanophotonics techniques to build the ultra precise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 10:52:02



Identifying 'friends' in an objective manner  

Scientists have developed a new method for identifying individuals that have essential connections between them -- what they call 'significant ties'.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 10:50:47



How manganese produces a parkinsonian syndrome  

Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the cells appears to disturb protein transport.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 10:48:44



Nepal earthquake: Waiting for the complete rupture  

Nepal was struck by an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 in 2015, but the country may still face the threat of much stronger temblor. This is the conclusion reached by researchers based on a new model that simulates physical processes of earthquake rupture between the Eurasian and Indian Plates.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 10:12:36



Mosquito known to transmit malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time  

A type of mosquito that transmits malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time, and the discovery has implications for putting more people at risk for malaria in new regions.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 09:59:06



Welding process for manufacturing industries  

New research will optimize the welding, additive and manufacturing process.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 09:17:11



Feathers: Better than Velcro?  

The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a new study. Researchers 3D printed models of the structures to better understand their properties.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 09:10:37



Born to run: Just not on cocaine  

A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice -- they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn't run around. In other tests, they still found cocaine appealing, but displayed an inability to shake the memory of cocaine's actions when the drug was no longer administered. The key change that blocks cocaine's stimulant effects in these mice is serotonin, not dopamine, which is responsible for producing a high.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 08:46:05



Right green for crop, environment, wallet  

Researchers found an efficient approach to managing nitrogen in agriculture and reducing its environmental impact. It's all about being green.

what do you think?

2019-01-16 08:25:22






Top Activity Today

register to participate
xpfree
morseabstracts.com
palma
greenpalm.net/
changer29
Biblicalpoetry.weebly.com
mindsmapped
mindsmapped.com/
ropyou
ropyou
SOPHIA1214
livehelpnumbers.com
entrance
emmaaman
toneexcelrich.blogspot.my/
peehusharmanightqeen
muskanrajput.in
Santiago
desalepandora.de/


Activity Feed

anonymous  liked the article 'Universe Feels Zero Connection To Guy Tripping On Mushrooms' in humor

anonymous  liked the article 'MAC Cosmetics: Little Mac Lipglass (various) + Mini Mascara ...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Markova Joins Impossible Foods, Kapadia Moves to VML London' in business

anonymous  liked the article ''Gotham' Season 2 casts James Frain as the villain to replac...' in T.V.

anonymous  liked the article 'Consider Benching Mariners Jean Segura | Time to Unleas...' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'If you need help smiling, we’ve got you. (26 Photos)' in humor

anonymous  liked the article 'The US Navy is making a nearly billion-dollar bet on drones ...' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Splurge: Beyoncé Enjoys Family Vacation In Cannes Wearing a...' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'How to Roast Chestnuts' in how-to

anonymous  liked the article 'Fashion Bomber of the Day: Tae from North Carolina' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'In search of Leonard, my martyred ancestor...' in religion

anonymous  liked the article 'Vin Diesel Shares Photo With Dwayne Johnson and Talks Fast &...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Celebratory Pizza' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Sweater Weather: Tips for a Warm & Cozy Home' in home

anonymous  liked the article 'Holloway finds significance in Hawaii-Detroit connections' in mma

anonymous  liked the article 'Survey: Dealers Prefer to Work With Japanese Automakers Over...' in vehicles

anonymous  liked the article '32 Degrees Men's Base Layer Tops or Leggings for $7 + free s...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article '3 Big Retail Earnings in Focus – WMT TGT SHLD' in business

anonymous  liked the article '24" Dell U2415 UltraSharp 1920x1200 LED Monitor + $100 Dell ...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'CES 2016 will be full of wearables, but would you really wea...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'easyFiT Folding Magnetic 2-in-1 Exercise Bike with Pulse Sen...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'NAO Drops Intriguing Visuals For “Girlfriend”' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Mountain Dew - D.Va' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Abbreviated Pundit Round-up: Will he or Will he not.' in politics

anonymous  liked the article 'Watch WAGS Miami Star Hencha Voigt Go Topless on the Beach: ...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'What Is Dark Matter Made Of? New Studies Slash Candidate Poo...' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Lucys Christmas Nightmare Video' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Reebok Men's Woven 2.0 Shorts for $20 + free shipping' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Hong Chau Joins HBO’s Watchmen in Key Role' in movies

anonymous  liked the article 'Kellyanne Conway's husband trolls Trump's tweet' in news

anonymous  liked the article 'Timberland Men's Maddsen Lite Hiking Boots for $52 + free sh...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Jodie Whittaker to Portray First Female 'Doctor Who&apo...' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Comcast buys Sky, Google CEO rejects bias claims video -...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'Destiny Xur Location and Items for June 2-4, 2017 Listed' in video games

anonymous  liked the article 'AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR Is Officially Rated PG-13 - Here&apos...' in comics

anonymous  liked the article 'Jos. A. Bank Men's Full-Length Coat for $69 + free shipping' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Michelin Announces 2019 Stars for the Netherlands ' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'Amazon- The Party's Just Beginning (2018) HD $0.99' in shopping


anonymous  liked the article 'Cardinals, Stephen Piscotty Agree To Extension' in baseball

anonymous  liked the article 'Wendy Wonka 2 issue 1: Psychocolate Meltdown' in art

anonymous  liked the article '12mm AAA-Lustrous Pearl Matinee 26" Necklace for $48 + free ...' in shopping


anonymous  liked the article 'Selkie Cat Goo TF 1/2 (Com)' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Spicy Lady' in animals

anonymous  liked the article 'Remember' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'The CFDA and FWD.us Partner to Call for Immigration Reform' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'Rockport Men's Break Cap Toe Zip Boots for $63 + free shippi...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article '2018 Local Search Ranking Factors: Google My Business Signal...' in web marketing

anonymous  liked the article '80-Count Glad 20-Gallon ForceFlex Kitchen Pro Drawstring Odo...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Copper Chef 5 Pc Cooking Set, Only $39.99 Shipped at Kohl...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Under Armour at eBay: Up to 60% off + free shipping' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Going gluten-free is an awful idea for most kids' in business


anonymous  liked the article 'ART RENDER material test!' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'First evidence of gigantic remains from star explosions' in science


anonymous  liked the article 'Trevor Noah Drops $20 Million on Bel-Air Bachelor Pad ' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Core strong, A's eye battery upgrades' in baseball

anonymous  liked the article 'INCREDIBLES 2 Official Trailer Sees Disney & Pixar'...' in comics

anonymous  liked the article 'Twitch Star DrLupo Raised $1.3 Million For St. Jude Children...' in vids

anonymous  liked the article 'Every team's best Draft pick of all-time' in baseball

anonymous  liked the article 'The sad story of college football's last tie' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'Poe' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Are men afraid of intelligent women?' in family


anonymous  liked the article '[+Video] Harajuku Chibi' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Ajak Deng Returns to Modeling a Week After Announcing Her Re...' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'Ancient Whale Basilosaurus Isis Was Head-Chomping Apex Preda...' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Ajak Deng Returns to Modeling a Week After Announcing Her Re...' in fashion

anonymous  liked the article 'Stratolaunch Backer Says It Remains Committed to Transformin...' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Le'Veon Bell saga: When he plays, fallout, trade option, mor...' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'Watch: The Master Chef Striving For Perfection at Joël Robu...' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'LOOK: A fan rushes the field and gains more yards than the R...' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'What magnetic fields can tell us about life on other planets' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Eastern Gray Squirrel ~ Cat Squirrel' in animals

anonymous  liked the article 'Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey gameplay revealed at Game A...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'The final eight is set.' in sports

anonymous  liked the article 'White House Aides to Continue Shutdown Discussions With Cong...' in news

anonymous  liked the article '2-Pack JKY by Jockey Men's Active Microfiber Stretch Boxer B...' in shopping

anonymous  liked the article 'Nintendo's Tencent Partnership Could Open Door to Switc...' in music

anonymous  liked the article 'Kate Middleton to Give Birth ''Any Minute:''...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Kobe Bryant says he has a 'comfortable' relationship with de...' in golf

anonymous  liked the article 'Oaks at Sepulveda Sherman Oaks CA' in real estate

anonymous  liked the article 'Kevin Spacey Emerges from Hiding in Wake of Sexual Assault C...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'How Much Money Kylie Jenner, Mindy Kaling and More Stars Act...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'Nikki Haley says U.S. 'work in Syria is not done'' in politics

anonymous  liked the article 'Did Charlie Puth Just Drop a Selena Gomez Reference in His M...' in entertainment

anonymous  liked the article 'A renewed gas pipeline is a geopolitical game changer' in business

anonymous  liked the article 'Khadrius Zhoth - Ascended Kings boardgame' in art

anonymous  liked the article 'Country Three Berry Pie' in food

anonymous  liked the article 'Sharp Money Would Have Been on the Over Number of Times Lil ...' in gambling

anonymous  liked the article ' SpaceCamper rearranges the Volkswagen camper van for light...' in tech

anonymous  liked the article 'How gay sex became a seminal motivation of–and reward for...' in lgbt

anonymous  liked the article 'In the Money in the PSPC: Scott Baumstein Leads Last 38 ' in gambling

anonymous  liked the article 'BREAKING: Magnitude 6.6 earthquake shakes Sapporo city in Ja...' in weather

anonymous  liked the article 'Could a Machine Identify Suicidal Thoughts?' in science

anonymous  liked the article 'Art Becomes Lethal in the Velvet Buzzsaw Trailer' in movies


anonymous  liked the article 'Downtown Street by Leonid Afremov' in art
All Rights Reserved.   Terms Of Use   Contact Us