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Science Daily: News Articles in Science, Health, Environment Technology

Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate environment, computers, engineering, health medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations. id=metasummary ScienceDaily -- the Internet's premier science news web site -- brings you the latest discoveries in science, health & medicine, the environment, space, technology, and computers, from the world's leading universities and research institutions. Updated several times a day, Science Daily also offers free search of its archive of more than 80,000 stories, as well as related articles, images, videos, books, and journal references in hundreds of different topics, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and more.



Conch shells may inspire better helmets, body armor  

Engineers have uncovered the secret to the exceptional toughness of conch shells, and say the same principles can be used for body armor and helmets.

2017-05-26 21:24:07
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Infections, other factors raise risk of pregnancy-related stroke in women with preeclampsia  

Infections, chronic high blood pressure and bleeding or clotting disorders increase the risk of pregnancy-related stroke in women with preeclampsia. Although pregnancy-related stroke is rare, women with preeclampsia are at higher risk of stroke during pregnancy and postpartum.

2017-05-26 21:11:59
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New cellular target may put the brakes on cancer's ability to spread  

Researchers have discovered a biochemical signaling process that causes densely packed cancer cells to break away from a tumor and spread the disease elsewhere in the body.

2017-05-26 20:44:52
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Fruit flies journey to International Space Station to study effects of zero gravity on the heart  

Researchers have announced that six boxes of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) will travel to the International Space Station (ISS) to study the impact of weightlessness on the heart. The fruit flies are scheduled to launch on June 1, 2017, from NASA's Kennedy Space Center and will travel to the ISS via a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft.

2017-05-26 19:47:20
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Controlling 3-D behavior of biological cells using laser holographic techniques  

Scientists have developed an optical manipulation technique that can freely control the position, orientation, and shape of microscopic samples having complex shapes.

2017-05-26 18:38:40
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The perils of publishing location data for endangered species  

While the increasing accessibility of data from scientific studies creates many benefits -- and represents a process that should be broadly embraced -- in the context of conserving endangered species it can actually be problematic, experts say.

2017-05-26 18:35:28
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Balancing rights and responsibilities in insurers' access to genetic test results  

Researchers have compared the regulation of life insurers' use of genetic information in the UK, Canada, and Australia.

2017-05-26 17:39:51
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Increased leaf abundance is a double-edged sword  

A new global assessment reveals that increases in leaf abundance are causing boreal areas to warm and arid regions to cool. The results suggest that recent changes in global vegetation have had impacts on local climates that should be considered in the design of local mitigation and adaptation plans.

2017-05-26 16:59:42
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Two genetic variants in bicuspid aortic valve development  

Researchers report a key protein is affected during heart valve formation, in the first genome-wide study of bicuspid aortic valve.

2017-05-26 16:44:30
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Cellular stress in the brain may contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease  

Research shows that cellular stress in the brain may contribute to development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

2017-05-26 12:10:12
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Mind-controlled device helps stroke patients retrain brains to move paralyzed hands  

Stroke patients who learned to use their minds to open and close a plastic brace fitted over their paralyzed hands gained some ability to control their own hands when they were not wearing the brace, according to a new study. The participants, all of whom had moderate to severe paralysis, showed significant improvement in grasping objects.

2017-05-26 12:01:28
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'Authentic' teachers are better at engaging with their students  

Teachers who have an authentic teaching style are more positively received by their students, according to new research.

2017-05-26 11:46:33
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A flip switch for binge-eating?  

Researchers have identified a subgroup of neurons in the mouse brain that, upon activation, immediately prompt binge-like eating.

2017-05-26 11:29:51
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CRKL in 22q11.2; a key gene that contributes to common birth defects  

The research findings imply that patients with genitourinary birth defects due to 22q11.2 changes in gene dosage should also be evaluated for other potential birth defects seen in patients with DiGeorge syndrome that would affect the patient's future health.

2017-05-26 11:26:38
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Bioelectricity new weapon to fight dangerous infection  

Changing natural electrical signaling in non-neural cells improves innate immune response to bacterial infections and injury. Tadpoles that received therapeutics, including those used in humans for other purposes, which depolarized their cells had higher survival rates when infected with E. coli than controls. The research has applications for treatment of emerging diseases and traumatic injury in humans.

2017-05-26 10:27:07
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'Tiny clocks' crystallize understanding of meteorite crashes  

Scientists are using new imaging techniques to measure the atomic nanostructure of ancient crystal fragments at meteorite impact sites. The end goal? To understand when impacts ended and life began.

2017-05-26 09:36:50
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Preliminary: BRCA variations may work alongside COMT variation to reduce breast cancer  

Researchers find through looking at genetic data sets of presumed cancer-free women who carry BRCA 1/2 variants, the co-occurrence of a rare COMT genetic variant in some women. This research outlines a strategy for looking at large genetic data sets for clues as to why a genetic carrier may never develop the associated diseases.

2017-05-26 09:28:12
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Dog skull study reveals genetic changes linked to face shape  

A study of dog DNA has revealed a genetic mutation linked to flat face shapes such as those seen in pugs and bulldogs.

2017-05-26 08:20:32
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Many patients with early-stage breast cancer receive costly, inappropriate testing  

A study shows that asymptomatic women who have been treated for early-stage breast cancer often undergo advanced imaging and other tests that provide little if any medical benefit, could have harmful effects and may increase their financial burden.

2017-05-26 07:20:47
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Chemical array draws out malignant cells to guide individualized cancer treatment  

Melanoma is a particularly difficult cancer to treat once it has metastasized, spreading throughout the body. Researchers are using chemistry to find the deadly, elusive malignant cells within a melanoma tumor that hold the potential to spread. Once found, the stemlike metastatic cells can be cultured and screened for their response to a variety of anti-cancer drugs, providing the patient with an individualized treatment plan based on their own cells.

2017-05-26 07:13:08
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How do blind cavefish find their way? The answer could be in their bones.  

Blind cavefish typically have skulls that bend slightly to the left. A study suggests this orientation might help them find food as they navigate in a perpetual counter-clockwise direction around a cave.

2017-05-26 05:52:20
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Century-old drug as potential new approach to autism  

In a small, randomized Phase I/II clinical trial (SAT1), researchers say a 100-year-old drug called suramin, originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, was safely administered to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who subsequently displayed measurable, but transient, improvement in core symptoms of autism.

2017-05-26 05:26:31
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Diesel pollution linked to heart damage  

Diesel pollution is linked with heart damage, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017.

2017-05-26 03:44:04
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Sweetening connection between cancer and sugar  

Scientists have found that some types of cancers have more of a sweet tooth than others.

2017-05-26 03:04:52
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Tiny shells indicate big changes to global carbon cycle  

Experiments with tiny, shelled organisms in the ocean suggest big changes to the global carbon cycle are underway, according to a new study.

2017-05-26 02:54:30
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Knowledge gap on the origin of sex  

There are significant gaps in our knowledge on the evolution of sex, according to a research review on sex chromosomes. Even after more than a century of study, researchers do not know enough about the evolution of sex chromosomes to understand how males and females emerge.

2017-05-26 02:53:08
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The 'ideal' teacher? It's all in your mind  

A study leverages the unvarnished opinions of Redditors to further our understanding of what makes a good educator.

2017-05-26 02:45:02
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DNA ladders: Inexpensive molecular rulers for DNA research  

New license-free tools will allow researchers to estimate the size of DNA fragments for a fraction of the cost of currently available methods. The tools, called a DNA ladders, can gauge DNA fragments ranging from about 50 to 5,000 base pairs in length.

2017-05-26 02:18:12
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Isolated Greek villages reveal genetic secrets that protect against heart disease  

A genetic variant that protects the heart against cardiovascular disease has been discovered. The cardioprotective variant was found in an isolated Greek population, who are known to live long and healthy lives despite having a diet rich in animal fat.

2017-05-26 01:41:22
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Mountain honey bees have ancient adaptation for high-altitude foraging  

Mountain-dwelling East African honey bees have distinct genetic variations compared to their savannah relatives that likely help them to survive at high altitudes, report researchers.

2017-05-25 21:38:15
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Look at Eva, 4 months old and standing  

Both the literature and practice indicate that children can stand without support starting at around 9 months old. Yet, with practice, children can stand without support even before they are 4 months old. This is much earlier than has been reported in the literature.

2017-05-25 21:01:11
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US nuclear regulators greatly underestimate potential for nuclear disaster  

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission relied on faulty analysis to justify its refusal to adopt a critical measure for protecting Americans from nuclear-waste fires at dozens of reactor sites around the country, according to a recent article. Radioactivity from such a fire could force approximately 8 million people to relocate and result in $2 trillion in damages.

2017-05-25 20:14:18
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Juno mission to Jupiter delivers first science results  

NASA's Juno mission is rewriting what scientists thought they knew about Jupiter specifically, and gas giants in general, according to a pair of Science papers released today. The Juno spacecraft has been in orbit around Jupiter since July 2016, passing within 3,000 miles of the equatorial cloudtops.

2017-05-25 20:08:53
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'Drastically' higher resolution to your TV and smartphone  

By developing a way to tune the color of individual pixels, researchers have eliminated the need for subpixels -- allowing a greater density of pixels and much higher resolution for video displays.

2017-05-25 19:56:59
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A new way to slow cancer cell growth  

Researchers have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells that characterize all types of cancer. By removing a specific protein from cells, they were able to slow the cell cycle, which is out of control in cancer. The findings were made in kidney and cervical cancer cells and are a long way from being applied in people, but could be the basis of a treatment option in the future.

2017-05-25 19:41:52
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Magnetic switch turns strange quantum property on and off  

A research team has developed the first switch that turns on and off a quantum behavior called the Berry phase. The discovery promises to provide new insight into the fundamentals of quantum theory and may lead to new quantum electronic devices.

2017-05-25 18:12:30
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Genetic risk factor for equine eye cancer identified  

A genetic mutation in horses has been identified that should help identify horses that are at risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the eye and enable horse owners to make informed breeding decisions.

2017-05-25 17:39:53
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Predicting threats to rainforests: New approach  

A new study highlights novel approaches to tackling deforestation. The team focused their research on Borneo, an island that has lost a staggering 30 percent of its forest since the 1970s and is among the most biodiverse and threatened on the planet. The loss of Bornean forests threatens species such as the orangutan, Sumatran rhino, and the Sunda clouded leopard; as well as emitting significant amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

2017-05-25 15:13:58
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Nanoalloys ten times as effective as pure platinum in fuel cells  

A new type of nanocatalyst can result in the long-awaited commercial breakthrough for fuel cell cars. Research results show that it is possible to significantly reduce the need for platinum, a precious and rare metal, by creating a nanoalloy using a new production technique. The technology is also well suited for mass production.

2017-05-25 13:58:55
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Marmoset monkeys learn to call the same way human infants learn to babble  

Human social groups have a strange tendency to share responsibility for taking care of infants; parents, older siblings, and other adult relatives all help to nurture babies. The only other primates that take care of infants this way are marmosets, a group of small, highly social monkeys from South America. In another striking parallel to humans, infant marmosets also benefit from frequent feedback while learning their vocal calls.

2017-05-25 13:56:43
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Multiscale modeling reveals key events during early atherosclerotic plaque development  

A new computational modeling technique could indicate when atherosclerotic plaques will likely undergo rapid growth, reports a new study.

2017-05-25 13:55:44
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One-dimensional crystals for low-temperature thermoelectric cooling  

Researchers studied the thermal and electrical properties of one-dimensional crystals composed of tantalum, silicon and tellurium for thermoelectric cooling at temperatures below 250 K (-23°C). The thermoelectric characteristics of these crystals were varied at temperatures ranging from the cryogenic level of 50 K up to room temperature by doping with molybdenum and antimony. The crystals' thermoelectric power factors greatly exceeded those of conventional materials around room temperature, ind...

2017-05-25 13:49:06
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Sorghum: Health food sweetener and now, clothing dye  

Sorghum has long been a staple food in many parts of the world, but in the US, it's best known as a sweetener and livestock feed. As demand for the grain soars, so does the amount of waste husks. To reduce this waste, scientists report a new use for it: a wool dye that can add ultraviolet protection and fluorescence properties to clothing.

2017-05-25 13:46:02
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Helping plants pump iron  

Genetic variants have been identified that help plants grow in low-iron environments, which could improve crop yields, say researchers.

2017-05-25 13:17:33
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In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything  

Using fruit flies, researchers have discovered a cascade of molecular signals that program gene activity to drive the fly from one stage of maturation to the next, like a baby turning into an adult. Part of this programming involves alterations to the way DNA is packaged. Those alterations open certain regions of DNA to allow gene activity and close off other regions to prevent gene activity. These changes to DNA accessibility occur in sequence.

2017-05-25 13:08:43
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The birth and death of a tectonic plate  

A new technique to investigate the underwater volcanoes that produce Earth's tectonic plates has been developed by a geophysicist.

2017-05-25 13:03:23
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Range of challenging meditation experiences  

Though it has gained popularity in the West as medically and psychologically beneficial, meditation can produce a much wider variety of outcomes, not all of them calm and relaxing, according to a new study that analyzes meditation-related challenges.

2017-05-25 12:50:36
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Ancient genetic markers in sockeye salmon can help manage healthier fish stocks  

A recent study identifies new genetic markers in sockeye salmon that can help improve management of fish populations.

2017-05-25 12:49:26
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Government transparency limited when it comes to America's conserved private lands  

A new study examined why private-land conservation data is sometimes inaccessible and found that limited capacity within some federal agencies as well as laws prohibiting others from disclosing certain information are to blame.

2017-05-25 12:35:15
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Scientists borrow from electronics to build circuits in living cells  

Synthetic biology researchers have demonstrated a new method for digital information processing in living cells, analogous to the logic gates used in electric circuits. The circuits are the largest ever published to date in eurkaryotic cells and a key step in harnessing the potential of cells as living computers that can respond to disease, efficiently produce biofuels or develop plant-based chemicals.

2017-05-25 12:02:31
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Fathers' brains respond differently to daughters than sons  

Fathers with toddler daughters are more attentive and responsive to those daughters' needs than fathers with toddler sons are to the needs of those sons, according to brain scans and recordings of the parents' daily interactions with their kids.

2017-05-25 11:54:01
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Increased protection of world's national animal symbols needed, suggests study  

The snowy-feathered head and distinctive brown body of the bald eagle is a proud national symbol of the United States, adorning the country's currency and passports. The lion, known as 'King of the Beasts,' represents national strength and identity in several African countries. But, how are populations of the planet's most valued wildlife faring in the 21st century? How well are societies protecting the species they have chosen to embody their ideals and represent their national identity?

2017-05-25 11:50:47
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Ancient DNA evidence shows hunter-gatherers and farmers were intimately linked  

In human history, the transition from hunting and gathering to farming is a significant one. As such, hunter-gatherers and farmers are usually thought about as two entirely different sets of people. But researchers reporting new ancient DNA evidence show that in the area we now recognize as Romania, at least, hunter-gatherers and farmers were living side by side, intermixing with each other, and having children.

2017-05-25 11:49:42
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IVF babies do not have lower cognitive skills than naturally conceived children  

Researchers analysed data of hundreds of UK children who had been born through IVF or ICSI (when the man has a low sperm count), testing the same groups of children every few years up to the age of 11. They found a positive association between artificial conception and cognitive development when a child was between the ages of three and five.

2017-05-25 11:39:50
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Shedding light on how humans walk, with robots  

Patients walking in clinical robotic suits do not modify their gait in response to forces that are meant to alter the height of their steps, though they do respond to alterations in step length, providing insight into how the human brain executes walking and improving rehabilitative robot design, researchers have discovered.

2017-05-25 11:29:03
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What bone proteomics could reveal about the dead  

Studying bones has helped scientists reconstruct what dinosaurs and other extinct creatures looked like. Taking this further, scientists recently started identifying proteins from bones to glean more information about remains. But one team has found that the reliability of this approach can depend on which bone is analyzed. Additionally, they report a forensic use for bone proteomics: potentially determining from bone proteins how old someone was when they died.

2017-05-25 11:08:07
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Landscape-scale erosion instabilities in the northern Gabilan Mesa, California  

If you ever fly from L.A. to San Francisco, California, you may notice the Gabilan Mesa off to the east as you begin your descent into San Francisco International Airport. If you look carefully, you might notice two strange things: a series of bleach-white scars, where rock outcrops disrupt the smooth, grassy hillslopes, and a strong asymmetry in the orientation of tributaries, with many flowing south and few flowing north.

2017-05-25 10:47:40
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Ochre use by Middle Stone Age humans in Porc-Epic cave persisted over thousands of years  

Middle Stone Age humans in the Porc-Epic cave likely used ochre over at least 4,500 years, according to a new study.

2017-05-25 10:45:41
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Paper test strip could help heart failure patients monitor their condition at home  

Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping -- it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip that could potentially allow patients to do this at home for the first time.

2017-05-25 10:45:38
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Population only part of tornado casualty story  

The strength of a tornado has a significantly larger effect than population on the number of casualties, new research concludes.

2017-05-25 10:28:12
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Metals from Bolivian mines affect crops and pose potential health risk, study suggests  

Exposure to trace metals from potatoes grown in soil irrigated with waters from the Potosi mining region in Bolivia, home to the world's largest silver deposit, may put residents at risk of non-cancer health illnesses, researchers warn.

2017-05-25 09:30:30
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From blue and black dresses to turbine blades, here's the science of 'fake fake' photographs  

A new study reveals the science behind a 'trick of the light' that made high-profile photographs of a major piece of public art appear 'faked' despite the pictures being entirely genuine. Vision science researchers found images of the 75-meter long wind turbine appeared super-imposed because of a visual illusion caused by light reflections playing on preconceived notions about how objects are lit in natural settings, altering the object's shape to the human eye.

2017-05-25 09:28:07
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Targets for better anti-thrombotic medicine identified  

Blood thinners, such as aspirin, reduce the risk of thrombus formation but also interfere with the initial clot formation that is essential for preventing blood loss from the wounds. Now researchers have discovered that a molecule plays a role in thrombus development, but not the initial clot formation, suggesting a new avenue for developing more specific and protective blood thinners.

2017-05-25 09:19:40
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Tai chi significantly reduces depression symptoms in Chinese-Americans  

A new study finds that a 12-week program of instruction and practice of the Chinese martial art tai chi led to significantly reduced symptoms of depression in Chinese-Americans not receiving any other treatments.

2017-05-25 09:14:14
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Unveiling the quantum necklace  

The quantum world is both elegant and mysterious. It is a sphere of existence where the laws of physics experienced in everyday life are broken -- particles can exist in two places at once, they can react to each other over vast distances, and they themselves seem confused over whether they are particles or waves. For those not involved in the field, this world may seem trifling, but recently, researchers have theoretically described two quantum states that are extraordinary in both the physics

2017-05-25 09:09:46
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Just after the Big Bang: Galaxies created stars a hundred times faster now  

A team of astronomers has discovered a new kind of galaxy which, although extremely old -- formed less than a billion years after the Big Bang -- creates stars more than a hundred times faster than our own Milky Way.

2017-05-25 08:59:18
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Zika virus likely circulated in Americas long before detection during 2015-16 epidemic  

Analysis of the largest collection of Zika genomes to date reveals the trajectory and evolution of the virus as it spread throughout the Americas, with implications for future surveillance efforts.

2017-05-25 08:57:58
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Border walls may pose big challenges to biodiversity, but smaller ones to humans  

Walls such as the proposed barrier along the US-Mexico border lead to habitat fragmentation and can close off animal populations by impeding movement.

2017-05-25 08:37:24
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Mindfulness-focused childbirth education leads to less depression  

A new study shows mindfulness training that addresses fear and pain during childbirth can improve women's childbirth experiences and reduce their depression symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period.

2017-05-25 08:25:19
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Zika reached Miami at least four times, Caribbean travel likely responsible  

With mosquito season looming in the Northern Hemisphere, doctors and researchers are poised to take on a new round of Zika virus infections. Now a new study explains how Zika virus entered the United States via Florida in 2016 -- and how it might re-enter the country this year.

2017-05-25 08:16:36
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Whales only recently evolved into giants when changing ice, oceans concentrated prey  

A team of scientists have traced the evolution of whale size through more than 30 million years of history and found that very large whales appeared along several branches of the family tree about 2 to 3 million years ago. Increasing ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere during this period likely altered the way whales' food was distributed in the oceans and enhanced the benefits of a large body size, the scientists say.

2017-05-25 08:13:17
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Viral protein may help chickenpox virus spread within the body  

The virus that causes chickenpox -- varicella zoster virus (VZV) -- possesses a protein that could enhance its ability to hijack white blood cells and spread throughout the body, according to new research.

2017-05-25 08:04:13
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New brain mapping tool produces higher resolution data during brain surgery  

Researchers have developed a new device to map the brain during surgery and distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues. The device provides higher resolution neural readings than existing tools used in the clinic and could enable doctors to perform safer, more precise brain surgeries.

2017-05-25 07:56:18
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How hand amputation, reattachment, affects brain: First-of-its-kind study  

Researchers have found evidence of specific neurochemical changes associated with lower neuronal health in these brain regions. Further, they report that some of these changes in the brain may persist in individuals who receive hand transplants, despite their recovered hand function.

2017-05-25 07:48:36
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Ineffective antibiotics form strong teams against deadly super bacteria  

Combinations of three antibiotics -- that are each ineffective against superbugs when used alone -- are capable of eradicating two of the six ESKAPE pathogens when delivered together, scientists have discovered.

2017-05-25 07:48:27
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Brain microenvironment makes HER2-positive breast cancer metastases resistant to treatment  

A novel mechanism behind the resistance of breast cancer brain metastases to HER2- or PI3K-targeted therapies has been discovered, and a treatment strategy has now been identified that may overcome this resistance.

2017-05-25 07:43:07
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Health benefits of moderate drinking may be overstated, study finds  

The benefits of light alcohol consumption, as well as the risks associated with not drinking at all, might not be as great as previously thought, according to researchers who examined the drinking habits of middle-aged adults.

2017-05-25 07:42:57
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Solving the riddle of the snow globe  

A new study finds the sedimentation of asymmetric objects in liquid is very different from that of symmetrical objects like spheres. The research may have practical applications in improving water treatment and industrial processes.

2017-05-25 07:37:42
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Oxytocin administered to the nose increases emotion perception in autism  

Intranasal oxytocin can influence how individuals with autism perceive emotion in others, a recent study has demonstrated. This is an important first step for a potential pharmacological treatment of autism.

2017-05-25 07:29:58
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High pressure key to lighter, stronger metal alloys, scientists find  

Subjecting complex metal mixtures called high-entropy alloys to extremely high pressures could lead to finer control over the arrangement of their atoms, which in turn can result in more desirable properties.

2017-05-25 07:04:43
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New molecule may lead to first synthetic one-dose antimalarial  

Researchers have developed a molecule which has the potential to become the first fully synthetic, one-dose treatment for malaria.

2017-05-25 07:03:47
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New way to control light with electric fields  

Researchers have discovered a technique for controlling light with electric fields.

2017-05-25 06:55:16
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Designer worm spit supercharges healing  

Globally, every 30 seconds a diabetic has a limb amputated because of a non-healing wound. A molecule produced by a Thai liver parasite could be the solution to those non-healing wounds -- and scientists are now able to produce a version of the molecule on a large enough scale to make it available for laboratory tests and eventually clinical trials.

2017-05-25 06:50:59
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Why the Sumatra earthquake was so severe  

An international team of scientists has found evidence suggesting the dehydration of minerals deep below the ocean floor influenced the severity of the Sumatra earthquake, which took place on Dec. 26, 2004.

2017-05-25 06:43:49
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Ancient Peru: Major discovery of early human life  

A-tisket, a-tasket. You can tell a lot from a basket. Especially if it's from ancient ruins of a civilization inhabited by humans 15,000 years ago. An archeologist is among the team who made a groundbreaking discovery in coastal Peru -- home to one of the earliest pyramids in South America. Thousands of artifacts, including elaborate hand-woven baskets, show that early humans in that region were a lot more advanced than originally thought and had very complex social networks.

2017-05-25 06:38:01
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Zika spread secrets tracked through new gene sequencing study  

Scientists studying the genetics of Zika virus in Brazil and beyond has provided a new understanding of the disease and its rapid spread through space and time. The research has significant public health implications and has the potential to improve responses to future outbreaks.

2017-05-25 06:25:49
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No evidence that brain-stimulation technique boosts cognitive training  

Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) -- a non-invasive technique for applying electric current to areas of the brain -- may be growing in popularity, but new research suggests that it probably does not add any meaningful benefit to cognitive training.

2017-05-25 06:09:29
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Your mobile phone can reveal whether you have been exposed to radiation  

In accidents or terror attacks which are suspected to involve radioactive substances, it can be difficult to determine whether people nearby have been exposed to radiation. But by analysing mobile phones and other objects which come in close contact with the body, it is possible to retrieve important information on radiation exposure.

2017-05-25 06:08:23
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Tree-climbing goats disperse seeds by spitting  

Ecologists have observed an unusual way in which treetop-grazing goats may be benefiting the trees: the goats spit out the trees' seeds.

2017-05-25 06:02:54
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New species of bus-sized fossil marine reptile unearthed in Russia  

A new species of a fossil pliosaur (large predatory marine reptile from the 'age of dinosaur') has been found in Russia and profoundly change how we understand the evolution of the group, says an international team of scientists.

2017-05-25 05:54:54
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Changing climate could have devastating impact on forest carbon storage  

Biologists have shown what could be a startling drop in the amount of carbon stored in the Sierra Nevada mountains due to projected climate change and wildfire events.

2017-05-25 05:39:35
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LA lawns lose lots of water: 70B gallons a year  

In summer 2010, Los Angeles was losing about 100 gallons of water per person per day to the atmosphere through the evaporation and plant uptake of lawns and trees. Lawns accounted for 70 percent of the water loss, while trees accounted for 30 percent, according to a new study.

2017-05-25 05:34:47
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7 

Are wolverines in the Arctic in the climate change crosshairs?  

Will reductions in Arctic snow cover make tundra-dwelling wolverines more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought? That's a question scientists hope an innovative method described in a new study will help answer.

2017-05-25 05:27:12
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6 

Volunteers help find star that exploded 970 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs  

Online volunteers have helped astronomers find a star that exploded 970 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs' time on Earth.

2017-05-25 04:54:46
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5 

Extreme Jupiter weather and magnetic fields  

New observations about the extreme conditions of Jupiter's weather and magnetic fields by astronomers have contributed to the revelations and insights coming from the first close passes of Jupiter by NASA's Juno mission.

2017-05-25 04:46:23
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5 

Simple copper complex shuts down botulinum neurotoxin poisoning  

Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium that causes the neurointoxication, which produces one of the most potent toxins on earth and is classified as a potential bioterrorism threat. While no cure exists -- and botulism treatment options are limited -- a serendipitous discovery may provide a new therapy that can stop the neurotoxin even in its more severe, advanced stages of action.

2017-05-25 04:31:44
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5 

How listening to music in a group influences depression  

New research takes a closer look at how music influences the mood in people suffering from depression, and examines what factors might affect whether listening to sad music in group settings provides social benefits for listeners, or if it rather reinforces depressive tendencies.

2017-05-25 04:15:27
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4 

Size-sensing protein controls glucose uptake and storage in fat cells  

Researchers have discovered that a molecule which can sense the swelling of fat cells also controls a signaling pathway that allows fat cells to take up and store excess glucose. Mice missing this protein, known as SWELL1, gain less weight (fat) than normal mice on a high-fat diet, but also develop diabetes.

2017-05-25 04:01:20
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1 

Program helps reduce risk of delirium, hospital length of stay for older patients undergoing surgery  

Older patients who underwent major abdominal surgery and received an intervention that included nutritional assistance and early mobilization were less likely to experience delirium and had a shorter hospital stay, according to a study.

2017-05-25 03:41:55
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2 

Effective restoration of aquatic ecosystems  

Despite having increased human wellbeing in the past, intense modifications by multiple and interacting pressures have degraded ecosystems and the sustainability of their goods and services. For ecosystem restoration to deliver on multiple environmental and societal targets, the process of restoration must be redesigned to create a unified and scale-dependent approach that integrates natural and social sciences as well as the broader restoration community, say researchers.

2017-05-25 03:16:39
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0 




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